Feature: Where is 'Away'?

Published November 2009 Vol. 13 Issue 10

by William Hillyard

photos by Guillermo Arias

Tanker truck delivers water in Tijuana neighborhood

At low tide, you could walk to Mexico, around the crusty palisade of the border fence, without even getting your shoes wet.  The thinnest can slip between the stakes, as kids do, dashing into America—‘look at me, mom!’—and slipping back again over the line.  The Pacific’s relentless waves and salt spray have long ago eaten the fence’s metallic flesh, leaving a disheveled skeleton of rusty spikes, 12 feet tall, like the broken and bent teeth of a giant scaly comb.  Dogs wander back and forth, around the pickets of steel—sections of railroad track actually, driven endwise into the sand—and sniff the cluttered beach, crossing the invisible line, the abstraction of the international border.  

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Art Feature: The Leslie Spit

Published November 2009 Vol. 13 Issue 10

text by Ross Evertson and photos by Ross Evertson and Davin Risk

 

In any city it is incredibly easy to take for granted—or be ignorant entirely—of the things that are happening beneath us. Transportation and sewer systems, fault lines and lagoons—modern, ancient and natural catacombs of all sorts functioning and hiding below our cities.

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Profile: Cafe Options: A new way to bake a living.

Published November 2009 Vol. 13 Issue 10

text and photos by D. Giles Clasen

Women working at Cafe Options

The word non-profit rarely carries thoughts of pizzazz.  When the word is combined with restaurant, our minds may drift to something more akin to a soup kitchen than a fine cafe. But Cafe Options is a delicatessen downtown that has managed to combine non-profit with fine-food.

The restaurant, located at 1650 Curtis St., is a place where customers receive smoked meats, pickles and mustard all prepared from scratch. They give downtown diners a different option than many of the chain eateries along the 16th Street Mall.  It also provides the opportunity for a small staff of low-income women to develop precious job experience as well as job skills as prep cooks.

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Freature: Magazine Crew - Human trafficking may have knocked at your door.

Published November 2009 Vol. 13 Issue 10

by Margo Pierce
photos by Adrian Diubaldo

 Some of the 27 million people worldwide who are bought, traded or are unwitting victims of human trafficking live and work in Colorado. It could be the person in the fields you drive past or on your doorstep telling you about a magazine offer. It’s not clear if Jose Garcia was a victim of human trafficking. He had one of those jobs that operates in a grey area. But one thing is certain: he is one of the lucky ones who was able to escape that possibility.

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News Briefs: No Camping: Rough Sleepers Get the Boot From Boulder

Published November 2009 Vol. 13 Issue 10

by Sarah Eckhoff

photo by Adrian Diubaldo

A woman rests outside the Carriage House in Boulder.

Jon Garrett carries his home on his shoulders. Every night he hopes to find a place where he can lay his head away from biting wind or cold rain. And at least four times in his almost two-year stint of homelessness, he has been wakened by law enforcement ready to convict him for this illegal activity.

Boulder Revised Code 5-6-10, Camping or lodging on property without consent, states that “no person shall camp within any park, parkway, recreation area, open space, or other public property” without first obtaining permission from the owner, supervisory officer or city manager. This means that from sunset to one hour after sunrise, any person carrying out “daily activities” such as eating, sleeping or seeking protection from the elements in a way other than clothing can be arrested.

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News Briefs: Homeless Health Goes Hi-Tech

Published November 2009 Vol. 13 Issue 10

The Department of Health and Human Services recently announced $2 million in grants for two health information technology initiatives in Colorado. The Colorado Coalition for the Homeless received $1,865,625 to implement electronic health records (EHRs), while the Colorado Community Managed Care Network, which serves 62 clinics in Colorado, received $250,000 to improve existing electronic health records. The CCH’s Stout Street Clinic has been operating in downtown Denver for almost 25 years, delivering healthcare to the homeless. The CCMCN’s patients are low-income and primarily medically underserved. Senators Mark Udal and Michael Bennet applauded the announcement of the grants, saying that the money will cut health care costs and reduce medical errors in Colorado, and also lead to better outcomes for the thousands of patients the two organizations serve every year. Detractors of EHRs warn that the electronic systems are not as efficient as they have been touted to be, and have led to misclassifications of illnesses by limiting diagnosis to check boxes on a form. The grants are part of $27.8 million in total grants announced in late September by the Department of Health and Human Services and provided through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.

-- Sarah Harvey

Beyond Denver: Turning Junk Mail into Art

Published November 2009 Vol. 13 Issue 10

by Alecia D. McKenzie

PARIS, France - Like everyone else, Barbara Hashimoto hated the junk mail coming in through the door. Until she decided one day that it could be transformed into art and lessons about the environment.
Hashimoto, a U.S.-born, Japanese-trained artist, has created “The Junk Mail Experiment,” in which huge quantities of unsolicited advertising mail are shredded into temporary installation art and eventually into sculptures. The “Experiment” is currently on view in Paris and in Chicago.

“I was working in a firm and was amazed at how much junk mail we received,” says Hashimoto, a slim dark-haired woman who speaks passionately about her work.

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