Traveler's Aid Fund in Grand Junction

Traveler's Aid Fund in Grand Junction

By Evan Vann

The city of Grand Junction has organized a Traveler's Aid Fund to ease the city’s homelessness problem. 

Officer David Keech of the GJPD Community Resource Unit said that the goal of the fund is to provide assistance to homeless individuals who find themselves stranded in the Grand Junction area. The fund helps an individual buy a bus ticket out of town to a destination where he or she can receive further help. The program received a $2,000 donation from the city as seed money, but is otherwise funded solely on donations from individuals and businesses in the community. 

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Ask a Vendor

This column shares the thoughts and opinions of the diverse group of people who make up the Denver VOICE vendor pool. Have a question for VOICE vendors? Help us continue the dialogue by submitting your questions to editor@denvervoice.org.


What is the biggest misconception about homelessness?


John Alexander

The biggest misconception is that homeless people are lazy, shiftless, no good, and no-count. That “these people” have never had anything in life, they don’t want anything, and they will never contribute anything worth mentioning. That they are a bunch of alcoholics and drug addicts. And most of all, that they wish to be homeless.

John Alexander. Photo by Giles Clasen.

John Alexander. Photo by Giles Clasen.

Joe Osckel

That people are homeless because they are lazy or on dope.

 

Stephanie Rogers

I think the biggest misconception of homelessness is that they are lazy. People don’t know that many homeless are unable to work due to an illness or handicap.

 

Armand Casazza

Not all homeless are mentally ill or drug addicts! My feeling is—regardless of why you are homeless—once you have hit rock bottom, no one really wants to help. Some of us didn’t have family to help us out there on the road of life. ■

Hot Town, Colorado

The flashpoint for a new boom cycle in uranium mining started in January, as President Obama called out for “a new generation of safe, clean nuclear power plants in this country.” Following his speech, the White House outlined a program in the 2011 budget with $55 billion in loan guarantees to build new plants across the country. In Colorado, the result has been very partisan battle lines being drawn, and citizens from across the state pouring into the Western Slope region in a fight over the past, present and future of Colorado.

With the desperation for jobs on the Western Slope reaching a fevered pitch, pro-mining voices are now vying against the health concerns of residents and activists. However, unlike past fights over the issue, environmentalism and the tourism industry are now standing toe to toe against the uranium and vanadium economy.

 

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